Singapore Red Cross — A Light Amid the Darkness

A viral infection necessitated the amputation of Aman Bin Liman's legs. Everything he had was gone in the blink of an eye—his legs, his friends and his job. He even lost his will to live. A hospital worker introduced him to the Singapore Red Cross (SRC). Since being enrolled in SRC’s Family LifeAid service, he has been receiving monthly supermarket vouchers that help put food on the table for his family.

Raising three children together with his wife, Aman Bin Liman toiled as a taxi driver before his right leg needed to be amputated in 2015 due to a viral infection. But that did not stop Aman. The doctors gave him a prosthetic right leg, which enabled him to work as a security guard so he could continue providing for his family. 

Just as things were on the mend for Aman and his family, tragedy struck again. His life was put on hold when his other leg was infected with the virus, forever changing his life. 

“Your leg has a viral infection. The virus may spread to the other parts of your body. We need to amputate your leg to save your life. If your leg is not amputated, you may die,” was the doctor's diagnosis. 

That grave diagnosis on Aman's left leg in September 2020 cast a pall on Aman's life, and it remains a painful memory that lingers on to this day. 

The difficulty of moving about weighs heavily on Aman, now aged 65. Aman was an active kid during his childhood days, playing many sports in school. He was just as active in his adulthood.

One by one, everything he had started to disappear—his legs, his friends and most importantly, his job. 

“My life totally changed. I used to be able to move about by myself. After the amputation, all my friends ran away," he laments.

Acceptance, with a hint of frustration

It has been a year since the tragedy struck him and his family, and Aman has come to accept his painful fate. Yet, it still distresses Aman occasionally as losing his legs and his job were not the only tribulations his family had to grapple with.

Aman's wife was forced to quit her job as a shop assistant due to swelling in her legs, which prevented her from standing for extended periods of time. By this point, their three children were teenagers, and although Aman is seen as the breadwinner for the family, he has been severely hampered by his disability. His feelings of apprehension and powerlessness had become overwhelming. Aman now spends his days at home in his wheelchair, reminded of the tragedy that struck and haunted by thoughts of the things he can no longer do. He even lost his will to live.

“I used to be able to provide for my family financially. Now, I have nothing in my pocket. In my heart, there are many things I wish to do. I want to work but I’m bound to a wheelchair,” says Aman, as he recalls the challenges he faced over the past year. 

For every bad, there is good

When all hope was lost and Aman felt that his world was torn apart, a light appeared at the end of the tunnel, giving him some measure of comfort that keeps him going till today. 

After becoming a double amputee, the hospital's social worker introduced him to the Singapore Red Cross (SRC). That’s when things started to look up for him and his family. 

Thanks a million

Since being enrolled in SRC's Family LifeAid service, his family has been receiving monthly supermarket vouchers that assist them in purchasing household necessities. Aman believes that if it was not for SRC, he would not have regained the will to live. 

“Singapore Red Cross provides supermarket vouchers that support my family, giving us hope. The vouchers ease my family's financial burden and enable me to put food on the table for my family,” says Aman, with gratitude. 

Assistance was provided when Aman's family needed it most. He is immensely appreciative of everything SRC has done for his family, and he hopes for their continued support.

By Insyirah Binte Johan, Volunteer
Copyedited by Michael Gutierrez, Volunteer

 

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